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Gender stereotypes are detrimental to American families

First Due Date and Time: Your announcement of Option One or Option Two (see below) and your announcement of your narrowed topic (see below) are due via the Blackboard drop box.

Second Due Date and Time: Your completed paper is due via the Blackboard drop box.
Length: approximately four double-spaced pages.


For the final project, you will write an essay that focuses on a gender in communication and culture topic. You may choose your area of focus, and you are encouraged to work with a topic that interests you.

You are required, however, to write an opinion-based essay or a rhetorical analysis. Regardless of which one of the two you choose, you are additionally required to follow the instructions, as detailed under each option.


Option One. An opinion-based essay. If you choose to write an opinion-based essay, you should first choose a topic with a narrowed focus, and then offer an argument that defends your position within a debatable issue. Your thesis should be clear and direct.


Bad Example: “Gender stereotypes exist.”
Great Example: “Gender stereotypes are detrimental to American families.”
Remember first and foremost that you are arguing.

This means you should take a stand, support your stand with evidence (see below), and continuously urge your read to share your perspective and insight. Your goal, of course, is to persuade those who already agree with you to stay with you or persuade those who, at first, might disagree with you to now agree with you.


Persuasion is the method you will take to make your case, and persuasion comes via the way of a series of appeals; those appeals are, in fact, types of evidence.


Series of Appeals and Evidence:
Ethos: the writer’s reputation, and what makes the writer qualified to comment on the topic; in other words, what makes you the one your reader should believe? In your essay, qualify yourself by establishing your credibility.

Have you performed research on your narrowed topic?

Do you have personal experience with your narrowed topic?


Pathos: human emotion, and the emotion that brought the writer to the narrowed topic and the same or different emotion that kept the reader focused on your narrowed topic. Which human emotion(s) are brought out by your information? It is pathos that will leave your reader with a personal connection.


Logos: evidence that case studies and published research have already shown. This is where you will cite the work of others, not yourself. You should be selective.

What is out there that nails your main point and helps you make your case?

What have other researchers and experts already proven and/or shown?

Requirements for the opinion-based essay:
1. Approximately four double-spaced pages;


2. At least one area of ethos. Tell us why you are the one to “take on” this topic and make the claim you are making;


3. An attempt to establish a reader’s pathos. Why should your reader care?


4. A minimum of three areas of logos. These may be expert opinions, published statistics, stories of focus groups, etc. Remember, you are not the expert;


5. Refutation. This means you should attempt to dismantle the common (or not so common) opposing argument;


6. An area of concession. Let’s face it; none of us are correct 100% of the time. So, where within your topic/opinion can you concede just a little and say, “This is where my opponent may have a point.”

Your goal here is to show that you are a reasonable person, even in disagreement and even when you have the “largely correct” position.
For more information, refer to the PowerPoint “Writing an Argumentation.”

As always, feel free to email me from your BSU account with questions or concerns.
How to choose your topic:
Perhaps you already have an idea in mind; if so, you may go ahead and send it along via the drop box. Remember that first due date: Tuesday, March 31, 9:30 a.m.


If you are stuck on choosing a narrowed topic, you are encouraged but not required to open our main text, The Gender Communication Connection. From there, browse chapter titles, subtitles, and/or bolded and bulleted points. What most interests you?Remember that first due date: Tuesday, March 31, 9:30 a.m.


I will respond to all submissions with an approval or an idea for improvement by the end of Wednesday, April 1. If I do not hear from you by Tuesday, March 31, 9:30 a.m., I will assign you a topic that will come from either Option One or Option Two (see below).
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Option Two. A rhetorical analysis. A rhetorical analysis is a written response to another writer’s published material; in other words, you have read something that you want to further explore by separating and explaining its individual parts.

You are not arguing; you are analyzing, or “piecing.” In a broader sense, a rhetorical analysis has you “writing about writing” and “researching about research.”


 Rhetoric: the art of science of the use of language
 Analysis: the separating of any material into its individual elements
To begin, you should already have a published piece of work that falls under our course topic of communication in gender and culture.

The published piece of work cannot be something that you wrote; it has to be a piece composed by another writer.


When writing your rhetorical analysis, you should:


?  somehow identify every person, place, point, purpose, audience, method, argument, detail, example, conclusion, and/or visual included in the publication;


?  consult a dictionary, encyclopedia, or secondary piece of research for any material not immediately understood;


?  perform independent research, utilizing the library databases and other approved resources;


?  consider the language, design, format, and organization of the published research;


?  question;


?  confirm and/or deny;


?  compliment and complement;


?  remain free from personal/unprofessional attack;


Requirements for the rhetorical analysis:
1. Approximately four double-spaced pages;


2. An explanation of the purpose of the other writer’s research/publication;


3. A suggestion of the intended audience;


4. Identification of the author’s ethos, possible pathos, and obvious logos;


5. Identification of any used fallacies or an attempt at avoiding fallacies;


6. A conclusion that announces the most effective part and the least effective part of the research, as well as your opinion on the overall effectiveness of the research.


For more information, refer to the PowerPoint “Writing a Rhetorical Analysis.” As always, feel free to email me from your BSU account with questions or concerns.


Remember: the first due date. If you choose Option Two, please use the drop box to include a link to the publication you are analyzing. I will respond to all submissions with an approval or an idea for improvement.

If I do not hear from you, I will assign you a topic that will come from either Option One or Option Two, and if Option Two, I will choose a nonnegotiable publication.

Gender stereotypes are detrimental to American families

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